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Posts Tagged ‘FOSS’

Volumio2 Release Candidate

April 15, 2016 1 comment

Last night I found time to finally install the first release candidate of Volumio 2, my preferred audio player software. This is more exciting than it sounds, because when I read the blogpost last summer that Volumio is going to be completely rewritten, with replacing the base technologies, I was a bit afraid that this will be one of the last bits that we heard from this project. Too many cool projects died after famous last announcements like that.

But not Volumio.

volumio2

After quite some development time the project released RC1. While there were a few small bugs in a beta, my feelings about the RC1 are really positive. Volumio2 has a very nice and stylish GUI, a great improvement over Volumio1. Album-art is now nicely integrated in the playback pane and and everything is more shiny, even if the general concept is the same as in Volumio1.

I like it because it is only a music player. Very reduced on that, but also very thought through and focussed to fulfill that job perfectly. I just want to find and play music from my collection, quickly and comfortable and with good sound quality. No movies, series, images. Just sound.

About speed: While the scanning of my not too big music collection on a NAS was a bit of a time consuming task in the past, this feels now much faster (maybe thats only because of a faster network between the Raspberry and the NAS?). Searching, browsing and everything works quite fluid on an Raspberry2. And with the Hifiberry DAC for output, the sound quality is more than ok.

This is an release candidate of the first release of the rewritten project, and the quality is already very good. Nevertheless I found a few things that did not work for me or could be improved. That the volume control is not working is probably because of the Hifiberry DAC driver, I remember there was something, but haven’t investigated yet.

There are some things in the GUI that could be looked at again: For example on the Browse page, there is the very well working search field. After entering the search term and Enter, the search result is displayed as a list of songs to select from. I wished that the songs were additionally grouped by albums, which should also be selectable to be pushed to the play queue.

Also it would be great if the Queue would somehow indicate which entry is currently played. I could not spot that.

But these are only minor findings which can easily be addressed later after enhancement requests were posted 🙂

I think Volumio2 is already a great success, even before it was released! You should not hesitate to try it if you love to listen to music!

Thanks for the hard work Volumio-Team!

Categories: FOSS, KDE, Release, Volumio Tags: , , ,

DIY Net Player

July 12, 2015 11 comments

Something I wanted to share is a device I recently built. It is a complete net player for music files, served by a NAS. It’s now finished and “in production” now, so here is my report.

The cherry ear net player, based on raspberry pi and HifiBerry Amp+.

The cherry ear net player, based on raspberry pi and HifiBerry Amp+.

Hardware

The device is based on a Raspberry Model B+ with a HifiBerry Amp+.

Cherry Ear backside with connectors and power supply

Cherry Ear backside with connectors and power supply

The Amp+ is a high-quality power amplifier that is mounted on the Raspberry mini computer, shortcutting the sub optimal audio system of the raspy. Only loudspeakers need to be connected, and this little combination is a very capable stereo audio system.

Software: Volumio

On the Raspberry runs a specialised linux distribution with a web based audio player for audio files and web radio. The name of this project is Volumio and it is one of my most favorite projects currently. What I like with it is that it is only a music player, and not a project that tries to manage all kind of media. Volumios user interface is accessible via web browser, and it is very user friendly, modern, pretty and clean.

It works on all size factors (from mobile phone to desktop) and is very easy to handle. Its a web interface to mpd which runs on the raspi for the actual music indexing and playing.

Volumio User Interface Example

Volumio User Interface

The distribution all is running on is an optimized raspbian, with a variety of kernel drivers for audio output devices. Everything is pre configured. Once the volumio image is written to SD-Card, the Raspberry boots up and the device starts to play nicely basically after network and media source was configured through the web interface.

It is impressive how the Volumio project aims for absolute simplicity in use, but also allows to play around with a whole lot of interesting settings. A lot can be, but very little has to be configured.

Bottomline: Volumio is really a interesting project which you wanna try if you’re interested in these things.

The Housing

I built the housing out of cherry tree from the region here. I got it from friends growing cherries, and they gave a few very nice shelfs. It was sliced and planed to 10mm thickness. The dark inlay is teak which I got from 70’s furniture that was found on bulky waste years ago.

After having everything cut, the cherry wood was glued together, with some internal help construction from plywood. After the sanding and polishing, the box was done.

Sizes

Sizes [cm]

The Raspberry and Hifiberry are mounted on a little construction attached to the metal back cover, together with the speaker connector. The metal cover is tightend with one screw, and the whole electronics can be taken off the wood box by unscrewing it.

At the bottom of the device there is a switching power supply that provides the energy for the player.

How to Operate?

The player is comletely operated from the web interface. The make all additional knobs and stuff superflous, the user even uses the tablet or notebook to adjust the volume. And since the device is never switched off, it does not even have a power button.

I combined it with Denon SC-M39 speakers. The music files come from a consumer NAS in the home network. The Raspberry is very well powerful enough for the software, and the Hifiberry device is surprisingly powerful and clean. The sound is very nice. Clear and fresh in the mid and heights, but still enough base, which never is annoying blurry or drones.

I am very happy about the result of this little project. Hope you like it 🙂

Categories: DIY, FOSS, Volumio Tags: , ,

ownCloud Client 1.8.0 Released

March 17, 2015 14 comments

Today, we’re happy to release the best ownCloud Desktop Client ever to our community and users! It is ownCloud Client 1.8.0 and it will push syncing with ownCloud to a new level of performance, stability and convenience.

The Share Dialog

The Share Dialog

This release brings a new integration into the operating system file manager. With 1.8.0, there is a new context menu that opens a dialog to allow the user to create a public link on a synced file. This link can be forwarded to other users who get access to the file via ownCloud.

Also the clients behavior when syncing files that are opened by other applications on Windows has greatly been improved. The problems with file locking some users saw for example with MS office apps were fixed.

Another area of improvements is again performance. With latest ownCloud servers, the client uses even more parallized requests, now for all kind of operations. Depending on the synced data structure, this can make a huge difference.

All the other changes, improvements and bug-fixes are too hard to count. Finally, this release received around 700 git commits compared to the previous release.

All this is only possible with the powerful and awesome community of ownClouders. We received a lot of very good contributions through the GitHub tracker, which helped us to nail down a lot of issues and improved the client tremendously.

But this time we’d like to specifically point out the code contributions of Alfie “Azelphur” Day and Roeland Jago Douma who contributed significant code bits to the sharing dialog on the client and also some server code.

A great thanks goes out to all of you who helped with this release. It was a great experience again and it is big fun working with you!

We hope you enjoy 1.8.0! Get it from https://owncloud.org/install/#desktop

ownCloud Client 1.7.0 Released

November 8, 2014 30 comments

Yesterday we released ownCloud Client 1.7.0. It is available via ownCloud’s website. This client release marks the next big step in open source file synchronization technology and I am very happy that it is out now.

The new release brings two lighthouse features which I’ll briefly describe here.

Overlay icons

For the first time, this release has a feature that lives kind of outside the ownCloud desktop client program. That nicely shows that syncing is not only a functionality living in one single app, but a deeply integrated system add-on that affects various levels of desktop computing.

Overlay Icons on MacHere we’re talking about overlay icons which are displayed in the popular file managers on the supported desktop platforms. The overlay icons are little additional icons that stick on top of the normal file icons in the file manager, like the little green circles with the checkmark on the screenshot.

The overlays visualize the sync state of each file or directory: The most usual case that a file is in sync between server and client is shown as a green checkmark, all good, that is what you expect. Files in the process of syncing are marked with a blue spinning icon. Files which are excluded from syncing show a yellow exclamation mark icon. And errors are marked by a red sign.

What comes along simple and informative for the user requires quite some magic behind the curtain. I promise to write more about that in another blog post soon.

Selective Sync

Another new thing in 1.7.0 is the selective sync.

In ownCloud client it was always possible to have more than one sync connection. Using that, users do not have to sync their entire server data to one local directory as with many other sync solutions. A more fine granular approach is possible here with ownCloud.

Selective SyncFor example, mp3’s from the Music dir on the ownCloud go to the media directory locally. Digital images which are downloaded from the camera to the “photos” dir on the laptop are synced through a second sync connection to the server photo directory. All the other stuff that appears to be on the server is not automatically synced to the laptop which keeps it organized and the laptop harddisk relaxed.

While this is of course still possible we added another level of organization to the syncing. Within existing sync connections now certain directories can be excluded and their data is not synced to the client device. This way big amounts of data can be easier organized depending on the demands of the target device.

To set this up, check out for the button Choose what to Sync on the Account page. It opens the little dialog to deselect directories from the server tree. Note that if you deselect a directory, it is removed locally, but not on the server.

What else?

There is way more we put into this release: A huge amount of bug fixes and detail improvements went in. Fixes for all parts of the application: Performance (such as database access improvements), GUI (such as detail improvements for the progress display), around the overall processing (like how network timeouts are handled) and the distribution of the applications (MacOSX installer and icons), just to name a few examples. Also a lot of effort went into the sync core where many nifty edge cases were analyzed and better handled.

Between version 1.6.2 and the 1.7.0 release more than 850 commits from 15 different authors were pushed into the git repository (1.6.3 and 1.6.4 were continued in the 1.6 branch which commits are also in the 1.7 branch). A big part of these are bug fixes.

Who is it?

Who does all this? Well, there are a couple of brave coders funded by the ownCloud company working on the client. And we do our share, but not everything. Also coding is only one thing. If you for example take some time and read around in the client github repo it becomes clear that there are so many people around who contribute: Reporting bugs, testing again and again, answering silly looking questions, proposing and discussing improvements and all that (yes, and finally coding too). That is really a huge block, honestly.

Even if it sometimes becomes a bit heated, because we can not do everything fast enough, that still is motivating. Because what does that mean? People care! For the idea, for the project, for the stuff we do. How cool is that? Thank you!

Have fun with 1.7.0!

DAV Torture

September 27, 2013 9 comments

Currently we speak a lot about performance of the ownCloud WebDAV server. Speaking with a computer programmer about performance is like speaking with a doctor about pain. It needs to be qualified, the pain, and also the performance concerns.

To do a step into that direction, here is a little script collection for you to play with if you like: the DAV torture collection. We started it quite some time ago but never really introduced it. It is still very rough.

What it does

The first idea is that we need a reproducable set of files to test the server with. We don’t want to send around huge tarballs with files, so Danimo invented two perl scripts called torture_gen_layout.pl and torture_create_files.pl. With torture_gen_layout.pl one can create a file that contains the layout of the test file tree, a so called layout( or .lay)-file. The .lay-file describes the test file tree completely, with names, structure and size.

torture_gen_layout.pl takes the .lay-file and really creates the file tree on a machine. The cool thing about is that we can commit on a .lay-file as our standard test tree and just pass a file around with a couple of kbytes size that describes
the tree.

Now that there is a standard file tree to test with, I wrote a little script called dav_torture.pl. It copies the whole tree described by a .lay file and created on the local file system to an ownCloud WebDAV server using PUT requests. Along with that, it produces performance relevant output.

Try it

Download the tarball and unpack it, or clone it from github.

After having installed a couple of perl deps (probably only modules Data::Random::WordList, HTTP::DAV, HTTP::Request::Common are not in perl’s core) you should be able to run the scripts from within the directory.

First, you need to create a config file. For that, copy t1.cfg.in to t1.cfg (don’t ask about the name) and edit it. For this example, we only need user, passwd and url to access ownCloud. Be careful with the syntax, it gets sourced into a perl script.

Now, create the local reference tree with a .lay-file which I put into the tarball:

./torture_create_files.pl small.lay tree

This command will build the file tree described by small.lay into the directory called tree.

Now, you can already treat your server: Call

./dav_torture.pl small.lay tree

This will perform PUT commands to the WebDAV server and output some useful information.
It also appends to two files results.dat and puts.tsv. results.dat just logs the results of subseqent call. The tsv file is the data file for the html file index.html in the same directory. That opened in a browser gives a curve over the average transmission rate of all subsequent runs of dav_torture.pl (You have run dav_torture.pl a couple of times to make that visible). The dav_torture.pl script can now be hooked into our Jenkins CI and performed after every server checkin. The resulting curve must never raise 🙂

To create your own .lay-file, open torture_gen_layout.pl and play with the variables on top of the script. Simply call the script and redirect into a file to create a .lay-file.

All this is pretty experimental, but I thought it will help us to get to a more objective discussion about performance. I wanted to open this up in a pretty early stage because I am hoping that this might be interesting for somebody of you: Treat your own server, create interesting .lay files or improve the script set (testing plain PUTs is rather boring) or the result html presentation.

What do you think?

Categories: FOSS, ownCloud Tags: , , ,

Csync Upstream Release 0.50.0

August 5, 2013 1 comment

Last week Andreas did an upstream release of the file synchronization software csync. Frequent readers know that csync is the sync engine that is used in the ownCloud client, so this is a very important and special release for us.

Yeah for upstream! The new release contains a lot of features and changes me and my collegues worked on during the last 18 month: First we added the ownCloud module to csync upstream, so that csync now is able to sync local directories to an ownCloud server. The ownCloud client works on platforms Linux and MacOSX and Windows. That required a lot of (tricky) changes to the csync platform which we carefully backported to csync upstream.

There are much more changes, such as: More compilers supported, a new logging framework, a new base lib to do unit testing, removal of not so common dependencies and other infrastructure changes. But also on the feature side there are more improvements, mainly to focus on a more easy and broader use of the csync library that allows to embed the sync functionality to various backends into other applications.

I am very happy that we kept our promise to contribute a lot of our changes back to upstream. Primarily that is the way to go in the open source world, you will say. But it was distressing to see how quickly people were whispering stuff like “Well, wouldn’t it be easier if you do a fork? Remember, you have to come to good results quickly for the company, why bother with an upstream project?”

For me, that wouldn’t be like companies in FOSS world should behave, and I know that on the long run, it would not be beneficial for the company either. So very good that the relevant people supported the idea of going with upstream from the beginning.

Does that mean that csync 0.50.0 and ocsync as shipped with ownCloud are the same now? No, unfortunately not. We did more changes on the ownCloud branch which need to be reviewed and probably won’t fit to csync the way they are now.
More work to be done, but we’re on the way!

Categories: FOSS, ownCloud, Release Tags: , ,