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Posts Tagged ‘Workshop’

Another DIY Net Player

August 5, 2017 2 comments

Following up on my first DIY Net Player Post on this blog, I like to present another player that I recently built.

teakear_sunf1

TeakEar media player

This is a Raspberry Pi based audiophile net player that decodes my mp3 collection and net radio to my Linn amplifier. It is called TeakEar, because it’s main corpus is made from teak wood. Obviously I do not want to waste rain forest trees just because of my funny ideas, the teak wood used here has been a table from the 1970ies, back when nobody cared about rainforests. I had the chance to safe parts of the table when it was sorted out, and now use it’s valuable wood for special things.

Upcycling is the idea here, and the central iron part has been a drawbar part from an old hay cart. The black central stone piece is schist, which I found outside in the fields, probably a roofer material.

teak_ear_back1

Backside view

I wanted to combine these interesting and unique materials to something that stands for it’s own. And even though it covers a high tech sound device, I decided against any displays, lights or switches to not taint the warm and natural vibes of the heavy, dark and structured exotic wood, the rusty iron part, which obviously is the hand work of a blacksmith many years ago, and the black stone. Placed on my old school Linn Classic amplifier, it is an interesting object in my living room.

On it’s backside it has a steel sheet fitted into the wood body, held in place by two magnets to allow it to be quickly detached. On that, a Raspberry Pi 2 with a Hifiberry DAC is mounted. The Hifiberry DAC has a chinch output which is connected to the AUX input of the Linn Classic Amplifier. The energy supply is an ordinary external plug in power supply, something that could be improved.

On the software side, I use Volumio, the open audiophile music player. The Volumio project could not amaze me more. After a big redesign and -implementation last year, it is back with higher quality than before but still the same clear focus on music playing. It does nothing else, but with all features and extension points that are useful and needed.

I enjoy the hours in my workshop building these kind of devices, and I am sure this wont be the last one. Maybe next time with a bit more visible tech stuff.

Categories: DIY, Volumio Tags: , , ,

SMB on openSUSE Conference

May 21, 2017 1 comment

The annual openSUSE Conference 2017 is upcoming! osc17finalNext weekend it will be again in the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany.

The conference program is impressive and if you can make it, you should consider stopping by.

Stefan Schäfer from the Invis server project and me will organize a workshop about openSUSE for Small and Medium Business (SMB).

SMB is a long running concern of the heart of the two of us: Both Stefan, who even does it for living, and me have both used openSUSE in the area of SMB for long and we know how well it serves there. Stefan has even initiated the Invis Server Project, which is completely free software and builds on top of the openSUSE distributions. The Invis Server adds a whole bunch of extra functionality to openSUSE that is extremely useful in the special SMB usecase. It came a long way starting as Stefans own project long years ago, evolving as proper maintained openSUSE Spin in OBS with a small, but active community.

The interesting question is how openSUSE, Invis Server and other smaller projects like for example Kraft can unite and offer a reliable maintained and comprehensive solution for this huge group of potential users, that is now locked in to proprietary technologies mainly while FOSS can really make a difference here.

In the workshop we first will introduce the existing projects briefly, maybe discuss some technical questions like integration of new packages in the openSUSE distributions and such, and also touch organizational question like how we want to setup and market openSUSE SMB.

Participants in the workshop should not expect too much presentation. We rather hope for a lively discussion with many people bringing in their projects that might fit, their experiences and ideas. Don’t be shy 🙂

 

 

Workshop at CERN

November 27, 2014 5 comments

cern_logoLast week, Thomas, Christian and myself were attending a workshop in CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneve, Switzerland.

CERN is a very inspiring place, attracting intelligent people from all over the world to get behind the secrets of our being. I felt honored to be at the place where for example the world wide web was invented.

The event was called Workshop on Cloud Services for File Synchronisation and Sharing and was hosted by CERN IT department. There have been around 100 attendees.

I was giving a talk called The File Sync Algorithm of the ownCloud Desktop Clients, which was very well received. If you happen to be interested in the sync algorithm we’re using, the slides are a nice starting point.

What amazed me most was the great atmosphere and the very positive attitude towards ownCloud. Many representatives of edu organizations that use ownCloud to which I talked were very happy with the product (even though there are problems here and there) from the technical POV. A lot of interesting setups and environments were explained and also showcased ownCloud’s flexibility to integrate into existing structures.

What also was pointed out by the attendees of the workshop was the importance of the fact that ownCloud is open source. Non free software does not have a chance at all in that market. That was the very clear statement in the final discussion session of the workshop.

The keynote was given by Prof. Benjamin Pierce from Pennsylvania with the title Principles of Synchronization. He is the lead author of
the project Unison which is another opensource sync project. It’s sync engine marks very high quality, but is not “up-to-date software” any more as he said.

I had the pleasure to spend quite some time with him to discuss syncing in general and our sync algorithms in particular, amongst other interesting things.

Atlas Detectors

Atlas Detectors

As part of his work, he works with a tool called QuickCheck to do very enhanced testing. One night we were sitting in the cantina there hacking to adopt the testing to ownCloud client and server. The first results were very promising, for example we revealed a “problem” in our sync core that I knew of, which formally is a sync error, yet very very unlikely to happen and thus accepted for the sake of an easier algorithm. It was impressive how fast the testing method was identifying that problem.
I like to follow up with the testing method.

Furthermore we met with a whole variety of other interesting people, backend developers, operators of the huge datasets (100 Peta-Byte), the director of CERN IT, a maintainer of the Scientific Linux and others.

Also we had the chance to visit the Atlas experiment, it is 100 meter underneath the surface and huge. That is where the particles are accelerated, and it was great to have the chance to visit that.

The trip was a great experience and very motivating for me, and I think it should be for all of us all doing ownCloud. Frank was really hitting a nerv when he was seeding the idea, and we all were doing a nice product of it so far.

Lets do more of this cool stuff!

Categories: Event, FOSS, ownCloud Tags: , , ,